Italian universities are allowed to teach in English – as long as they do not neglect their native language. The Italian state council rejected an appeal by Milan's Polytechnic university curbing its attempt to teach exclusively in English. The council stated that it is illegitimate to provide all academic courses in a foreign language regardless of the subjects taught and the students' nationality. English-taught courses at some Italian universities are already available and have been rising in popularity over the past years. Universitaly, a student-centered website, counts at least 339 English-taught courses within 56 different Italian Universities. Other European nations seem more accustomed to teaching in English, with Germany offering around 1000 English-taught courses and the Netherlands surpassing 1,500 with programs including seminars and short courses. The Accademia della Crusca, a Florence-based society for scholars and linguists, hailed the state council's decision as a “victory” for Italian universities. “Let us be clear: There is nothing wrong with teaching in English - a spokesperson told Il Sole 24 Ore - Unless it is not just a way to attract enrollments, without educating people”.